H.P. Lovecraft Giveaway

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H.P. Lovecraft was a master storyteller and creator. As an enormous fan, I hope this hardcover giveaway of a collection of his greatest works inspires other writers and takes readers to unimagined places. As a bonus for the confirmed winner, send me a message through Facebook or Goodreads to receive a free Amazon gift e-copy of CyberWeird Stories. Enter to win – https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/80cc8229f3ace2d6

CyberWeird Stories

CyberWeird Stories is finally finished. The cover is amazing and I couldn’t be happier with the fantastic stories inside. Available in e-book and print with the audiobook due to be released in late July. Thanks to everyone for your encouragement and support. The long wait is over just in time for your summer reading.

A boy bends down to examine a tiny bug on the cement. It has too many legs, mean pinchers, and its black shell glints metallically in the afternoon sun. Fascinated, he pokes at the wriggling creature with a twig and waves over his friends. A crowd approaches, but the bug is gone. Frantic, the boy slaps at his sleeves, runs his fingers through his hair, searching for the little monster that he knows has somehow gotten under his skin.

These stories are like that.

In the past, science fiction and horror writers were philosophic soothsayers who warned the public about scenarios that wouldn’t appear for decades. Now, the impossible happens the day after we think of it.

Nursing homes run by robots, androids that contract cancer, criminals sentenced to virtually experience their crimes as if they where the victims, printed people, children trapped in neo-ghost-cities were the adults have disappeared, and a space explorer who finds the homeland of H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu.

These are just a few of the fascinating stories you’ll find wriggling across these pages.

Just be careful they don’t get under your skin.

The Writer’s Coffeehouse – SoCal

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San Diego’s Newest Writer’s Resource.

I recently had the pleasure to attend a gathering of up-and-coming writers and artists organized by Jonathan Maberry. Dubbed the Writer’s Coffeehouse, this group of dedicated storytellers came together to talk candidly about the joys and frustrations of the craft.

As I was not initially planning on writing a summary, I apologize if some of the topics covered at the meeting are missing from the following description.

After initial introductions and establishing that the coffeehouse meetings will occur on the first Sunday of every month (with the exception of next month due to Easter), Jonathan mediated the group.

Topics Covered.

  • Know your audience:
    • Middle grade (8-12 years old) are broken into the younger crowd (Goosebumps at 8-10) and the 10-12 set.
    • Young Adult (12-17 years old) again broken up into (12-15) adventure and first romance, and the (15-17) romance, real world issues, and risk-taking.
    • New Adult (17 and beyond) Sex, drug use, and more mature real world issues.
  • Big advances can hurt first-time authors because they may not sell enough books to earn out the advance. A smaller advance will make the novel look successful to the bean counters and may make a second book deal more likely.
  • There is something called a stepped advance where an author’s advance is staggered based on the number of copies sold – something to consider when negotiating a contract.
  • Social Media, love it or hate it, is unavoidable. Reddit, Google hangouts, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc.  It’s a necessity in the publishing recipe.
  • Publisher Marketplace is an essential tool for researching agents and their recent deals.
  • Publishing is a business. A good business partnership is built on mutual respect and trust. Work on developing a relationship with people from the writing community and with agents/editors.
  • Try to build up fellow artists. Give positive feedback and constructive advice. There is more than enough room at the top for everyone. Writers should help fellow writers.
  • Cover quotes are great ways to relate to potential readers who may need to have your work vetted by an author they know and like.
  • Send out X-Mas cards: Understand and respect all the people who make a published story happen. Remember who they are and how important they are in making your story a success.
  • Comic books are another format, and audience, that boost your platform, but the dynamics of publishing are different.
  • Pen names – There was a variety of opinions, but the consensus was it is hard enough to get your message out there. Don’t make it harder on yourself. Use your real name. You’re creating a brand with your name: stand behind it.
  • When you do send your work out, it should be in Word format.
  • Jonathan’s technique for short stories is to write the ending first and work backward.
  • Interview, blog, and promote other writers.
  • Writer’s block is a fallacy.
    • It can mean you’ve taken the wrong path with a story. Back up and start down a different path.
    • Try a different angle or perspective/point of view.
    • Write a more interesting part of the story and then come back to the place you got bogged down.
    • Don’t obsess about writing it well the first time – just write it. Real writing occurs with the edits and revisions.

I’m sure I missed a number of key points, but I was honestly engrossed in the discussion and the pure energy of the meeting and forgot to take detailed notes. Everyone had suggestions, advice, and personal stories to share. I had a wonderful time and hope to attend many more sessions.

Thank you, Jonathan Maberry, Keith Strunk, The Mysterious Galaxy Book Store, and all of you who contributed to this dynamic event. Bravo!

D.C. Lozar

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